Resources

 

Paul Revere’s engraving of the Boston Massacre. The Boston Massacre is an early and well-known instance of police brutality in Boston. On March 5, 1770, British soldiers shot into a crowd of Boston citizens who were taunting them. Five people were killed and several others were wounded. Though the British commander and most of the soldiers were acquitted at trial, the incident became a rallying cry for the American Revolution.

LEGAL SERVICES AND LAWYER REFERRAL SERVICES

Prisoners' Legal Services (formerly MCLS)

Massachusetts Bar Association Lawyer Referral Service

National Lawyers Guild Lawyer Referral Service

Massachusetts Law Reform Institute (MLRI)

 

CIVIL RIGHTS ORGANIZATIONS AND BLOGS

Amnesty International

American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)

American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts (ACLUM)

American Constitution Society

Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR)

Citizen Works

Citizens' Commission on Civil Rights (CCCR)

CivilRights.Org

Common Dreams News Center

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (LCCR)

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law of the Boston Bar Association (LCCR-BBA)

Massachusetts Citizens Against the Death Penalty (MCADP)

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

Photography is Not a Crime

Prison Legal News

Public Citizen

Families Against Mandatory Minumums


POLICE AND POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY ORGANIZATIONS

National Police Accountability Project (NPAP)

National Police Misconduct Reporting Project

 

LAWYERS ASSOCIATIONS

Asian-American Lawyers Association of Massachusetts (AALAM)

Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA)

American Bar Association Individual Rights and Responsibilities Section (ABA IRR)

Federal Bar Association (FBA)

Massachusetts Academy of Trial Attorneys (MATA)

National Lawyers Guild (NLG)

National Lawyers Guild, Massachusetts Chapter (NLG-Mass.)

 

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THE WORK WE DO, WE RECOMMEND THESE BOOKS ABOUT PRISONS, POLICE MISCONDUCT, WRONGFUL CONVICTIONS AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Each of these books examines part of the criminal justice system and shows how the system is unjust. These books are not legal research. You do not have to be a lawyer to understand them.

A World Apart: Women, Prison, and Life Behind Bars, by Cristina Rathbone

All Alone in the World: Children of the Incarcerated, by Nell Bernstein

Inside This Place, Not of It: Narratives from Women’s Prisons, by Ayelet Waldman

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander

The Fence, by Dick Lehr

Tulia: Race, Cocaine, and Corruption in a Small Texas Town, by Nate Blakeslee

A Cinderella Affidavit, by Michael Fredrickson

Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States, by Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock

The Real Cost of Prisons Comix, by Lois Ahrens

Actual Innocence: When Justice Goes Wrong and How to Make it Right, by Barry Scheck, Peter Neufeld and Jim Dwyer

Convicting the Innocent, by Brandon Garrett

Above the Law Police and the Excessive Use of Force, by Jerome H. Skolnick and James J. Fyfe

Police Brutality, edited by Jill Nelson

Driving While Black, by Kenneth Meeks

Power Concedes Nothing, by Connie Rice

Police Power: Police Abuses in New York City, by Paul Chevigny

Edge of the Knife, by Paul Chevigny

Breaking the Blue Wall: One Man's War Against Police Corruption, by Justin Hopson

The NYPD Tapes: A Shocking Story of Cops, Cover-ups, and Courage, by Graham A. Rayman

The New World of Police Accountability, by Samuel E. Walker and Carol A. Archbold

The Central Park Five: A Chronicle of a City Wilding, by Sarah Burns

The Conservative Assault on the Constitution, by Erwin Chemerinsky

Newjack: Guarding Sing-Sing, by Ted Conover

Running the Books: The Adventures of an Accidental Prison Librarian, by Avi Steinberg